Guañape Sur
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Shorts - Ann Arbor Film Festival Michael Moore Award Winners
Old Town PlayhouseThu, Aug 2, 2012 3:00 PM
Celebrating the 50th anniversary of another great Michigan film festival—one that has long been a haven for avant-garde and experimental masters from around the world—we are proud to present three recent winners of the Ann Arbor Film Festival’s Michael Moore Award for Best Documentary Film: a city symphony on the crazed pace of modern China’s urbanization, a view onto a remote island off the Peruvian coast where workers harvest the droppings of thousands of birds once every 11 years, and a portrait of life in a region of northern Russia that is still contending with the debris from hydrogen bomb testing.
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Shorts - Ann Arbor Film Festival Michael Moore Award Winners
Dutmers TheaterFri, Aug 3, 2012 6:30 PM
Celebrating the 50th anniversary of another great Michigan film festival—one that has long been a haven for avant-garde and experimental masters from around the world—we are proud to present three recent winners of the Ann Arbor Film Festival’s Michael Moore Award for Best Documentary Film: a city symphony on the crazed pace of modern China’s urbanization, a view onto a remote island off the Peruvian coast where workers harvest the droppings of thousands of birds once every 11 years, and a portrait of life in a region of northern Russia that is still contending with the debris from hydrogen bomb testing.
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Film Info
Section:Short Films
Release Year:2010
Runtime:24 min
Type of Film:Short Documentary
Production Country:Italy, Peru
Original Language:Spanish
Subtitles:English
Cast/Crew Info
Director:János Richter
Produced by:Heidi Gronauer
Lorenzo Paccagnella
János Richter
Screenwriter:János Richter
Cinematography:Jakob Stark
Editing By:János Richter
Description

Michael Moore Award Best Documentary Film, 50th AAFF

A barren rock island of the coast of Peru. No soil, no water, but hundreds of thousands of birds. For a period of ten years, only two guards may live on Guañape Sur. In the eleventh year though, hundreds of workers arrive for the harvest of the birds' excrement.

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