Disorder (Xianshi Shi Guoqu De Weilai)
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Shorts - Ann Arbor Film Festival Michael Moore Award Winners
Old Town PlayhouseThu, Aug 2, 2012 3:00 PM
Celebrating the 50th anniversary of another great Michigan film festival—one that has long been a haven for avant-garde and experimental masters from around the world—we are proud to present three recent winners of the Ann Arbor Film Festival’s Michael Moore Award for Best Documentary Film: a city symphony on the crazed pace of modern China’s urbanization, a view onto a remote island off the Peruvian coast where workers harvest the droppings of thousands of birds once every 11 years, and a portrait of life in a region of northern Russia that is still contending with the debris from hydrogen bomb testing.
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Shorts - Ann Arbor Film Festival Michael Moore Award Winners
Dutmers TheaterFri, Aug 3, 2012 6:30 PM
Celebrating the 50th anniversary of another great Michigan film festival—one that has long been a haven for avant-garde and experimental masters from around the world—we are proud to present three recent winners of the Ann Arbor Film Festival’s Michael Moore Award for Best Documentary Film: a city symphony on the crazed pace of modern China’s urbanization, a view onto a remote island off the Peruvian coast where workers harvest the droppings of thousands of birds once every 11 years, and a portrait of life in a region of northern Russia that is still contending with the debris from hydrogen bomb testing.
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Film Info
Section:Short Films
Release Year:2009
Runtime:58 min
Type of Film:Feature Documentary
Production Country:China
Original Language:Chinese
Subtitles:English
Cast/Crew Info
Director:Weikai Huang
Produced by:Weikai Huang
Jiuchu Li
Cinematography:Weikai Huang
Editing By:Weikai Huang
Description

Michael Moore Award Best Documentary Film, 49th AAFF

Huang Weikai's unique documentary captures, with remarkable freedom, the anarchy, violence and seething anxiety animating the breakneck pace of China's contemporary urbanization. A man dances in the middle of traffic while another tries to jump from a bridge before dozens of onlookers. Pigs scattering from an overturned truck run wild on a highway while dignitaries swim in a heavily polluted river. These scenes, unshowable on China's strictly controlled television networks, reflect an emerging grass roots media, one that can capture at ground level the palpable, vibrant and often dangerous upheavals taking place in China today.

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